A King or prince is mounted on his horse. The white horse is draped is royal colours. The prince holds a garland atop his staff and wears another on his head. Alongside him walks a crowd, also holding wands.

After the turmoil of the Five of Wands we are finally on the move again. The scene in the Six of Wands depicts some sort of victory parade. Central to the theme is that of public recognition – the King celebrates his achievements in public and the crowd around the horse indicate that it is not a solitary victory.

six-of-wandsThe white of the horse signifies a pure victory, one that is noble and right. This is not a victory that we have won using devious or underhand methods. This victory is righteous one, of good over evil. The two wreaths or crowns symbolise this victory.

The Six of Wands in readings may suggest a public acknowledgement of a victory or achievement. It may mean our boss at work recognising our skill and effort, a graduation at college or an award for our business. Perhaps our family and loved ones appreciate all that we do for them. This card indicates that whatever our achievement, it is one that we will celebrate with others.

Reversed
The Six of Wands reversed indicates a delayed or frustrated achievement. We may be close to success but it still eludes us. It may even be that we have received negative feedback. At work, our superiours may have blasted us in front of other employees or we may fail at a task in public.

Reversed, this card also suggests that public recognition of our achievement is muted. It is one of those achievements that we thought would be important but which turns out to barely register with those around us. People shrug at our graduation, no-one notices you’ve increased sales, no-one cares at your election to Chairman.

It’s as if our ego is to take a hit. We may have expected a celebration party but we are the only people who turned up.

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